YOUR RUNDOWN

We have a new treatment option for wet AMD.

The FDA just approved a new anti-VEGF agent called Beovu.

How is Beovu (aka brolucizumab) different from the other anti-VEGF options?

There are three main differences:
1. Its molecular size.
2. The drug concentration.
3. The time between injections.

Beovu is the smallest anti-VEGF molecule tested in humans to date. The small size allows for better tissue penetration and the ability to administer higher drug concentrations. These two factors lengthen the treatment effect, allowing for more time between injections.

What about the clinical trials?

Beovu was shown to be just as good as Eylea in phase 3 trial results from the HAWK and HARRIER trials, which followed more than 1,800 patients in more than 400 sites worldwide.

Why do we need Beovu if it performs the same as Eylea?

Because there's more to the story. Vision improvement was similar between Beovu and Eylea, but the decrease in central subfield thickness (aka retinal fluid) was significantly greater with Beovu than with Eylea. Another important point is that Beovu also required less frequent injections (it’s dosed every 12 weeks after the initial loading dose).

Any side effects?

The most common adverse events (≥ 5% of patients) were blurred vision, cataract, conjunctival hemorrhage, vitreous floaters, and eye pain. (via)


WHAT YOUR PATIENT MIGHT ASK YOU

Are there any preservative-free tears that don't come in vials?

Yes! Allergan has announced the debut of Refresh Relieva, an artificial tear that has a preservative-free option, but in a multidose bottle.

You might be thinking, “Weird, Refresh Relieva looks a lot like Refresh Repair." Great observation—Refresh Repair has actually been rebranded to Relieva.(via)


SOCIAL MEDIA ROUNDUP

An app to detect leukocoria.

The father of a child with retinoblastoma created an app called Cradle to help with early detection. (via)

2.2 billion.

The number of people with vision impairment, of which, more than half either could have been prevented or have yet to be addressed, according to the WHO World report on vision. (via)

Thanks for reading! See you next week.