Several news outlets reported last week that people who eat oranges are “60% less likely to lose their eyesight from AMD.”
It’s not clickbait. They are citing this study which was published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Let’s discuss.
The study used data from patients in the Blue Mountain Eye Study, a large population based study that began in the early 1990’s in Australia and followed people for 15 years.
The authors looked at fundus photos to grade the presence of AMD and gathered nutrition information via questionnaires that gauged the patients level of flavonoid intake. They then compared the data to their follow-ups 15 years later.

What has flavonoids?
Oranges, tea, chocolate, and red wine are a few but this study found that the most common flavonoids consumed in this population were apples, oranges, orange juice, and tea.

What did the study find?
They found that the people who consumed a diet high in these flavonoids had a 57% reduced likelihood of AMD compared with people who consumed little to no flavonoids.

What is so great about flavonoids?
It’s not totally clear how they play a role in AMD but flavonoids may have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities and there is also strong evidence that flavonoids positively affect vascular health through improved endothelial function.

Does this mean we are changing up the AREDS formula?
Not yet but the authors state “it is reasonable that adequate intakes of fruit (particularly oranges), vegetables, and beverages
(e.g., orange juice) containing flavonoids be recommended to patients.” (via)